Open Letter to EU Commissioner Laszlo Andor

I watched with much interest and some disbelief your interview on BBC Hard Talk with Stephen Sackur on Friday, 29 November 2013.

In many ways I thought you demonstrated a near total failure to grasp the British political ‘psyche’ and its attitude to the corrupt, corrupting and anti democratic EU. At least on three occasions in the interview Sacker said: ‘you don’t get it, do you?’ – and he was spot on – you demonstrated a near total absence of historical and cultural context, rather surprising given that, as I understand it, you spent some time at the University of Manchester.

You did, of course, behave like an unelected bureaucrat, unanswerable to any electorate!
What I found particularly objectionable and grossly insensitive was your characterisation of Britain (in any context) as ‘hysterical’ and ‘nasty’. This is crass and unmindful of Britain’s contribution to European freedom in at least two World Wars.

I have some family connection to Hungary and as part of my job travelled there on several occasions ( still have friends who I visit). Given that you come from a country which historically is probably unmatched for xenophobia, racism, anti-gypsies and anti-semitism; not to mention dislike of Ukranians, Romanians and generally all foreigners (kulfoldi?), you should refrain from making such unfair and untrue comments.

Was the Hungarian Revolution against the Soviet Union in 1956 hysterical? Was it, as they claimed, a counter-revolution? As Margaret Thatcher rightly noted, why permit the oppression from the EU when (at least in Eastern Europe) it had freed itself from Soviet domination? The ‘difference’ is only that one oppresses with tanks; the other with quasi-judicial denial of democracy and self government. You appeared completely unmindful (at least in your comments on Hard Talk) of Britain having enjoyed a thousand years of freedom and near 200 years of democracy. Whilst this was the case, Hungary was a battleground of tribal warlords and oppression by Mongols, Turkey, Austria, Germany and Soviet Union – and now the EU! As one Hungarian put it to me: having experienced oppression by each of these in succession, the European Union’s more subtle oppression is relatively benign!

Yet oppression remains oppression irrespective of its source or form and the UK will not tolerate it much longer; I campaign to withdraw. On immigration, you were, quite frankly, naive! Do you think Hungarians, especially with their right-wing government (Fidesz?) welcome Romanians and Bulgarians with open arms? Do you really believe Spain, with 45-50% youth unemployment and 25% overall would do so? Do wake up to reality – and appreciate that politics is not invariably about rational decisions alone!

To make some amends you should withdraw your unwelcome comments which, when set against British sacrifices against your former allies in Europe, Nazi Germany, Italy and Vichy France you should be much more humble. Indeed, Britain, in the forefront of resistance to totalitarian Soviet domination through NATO, facilitated the collapse of the Warsaw Pact countries which, eventually gave Hungary some measure of freedom (if only temporalily, until the EU stepped in).

I am aware that EU Commissioners are required to leave their national interests out of their duties, however I believe they should nevertheless have some awareness of European history which may help them to avoid crass comments and realise that there was and remains a Europe which remains outside and prior the Treaty of Rome.

Dr. Robert G. Walmsley

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Diplomats and the EU

The softening up of the British electorate in advance of a possible referendum on the EU continues apace.  Somewhat surprisingly, given the venue and subject matter, Sir Christopher Meyer, former Ambassador in Washington offers words of wisdom at the Cheltenham Literature Festival sponsored by The Times, on Britain’s relationship with the United States. According to Sir Christopher, the US is ‘ very worried about defence cuts and they don’t like the idea of a referendum that would result in us leaving the European Union’.

One hopes the former Ambassador is right about the result of a referendum!  What the UK decides is, of course, a matter for the electorate here; I cannot recall the British government commenting on whether the US should join the North Atlantic Free Area. It is no business of the US to comment on our relations with the EU.

What is especially significant is that The Times should be giving space to such politically charged views in advance of a referendum; no need to guess which side of the argument it will take on the referendum.

Dr. Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

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Softening Up Britain in Favour of Remaining in the EU (2)

The Japanese are, of course, not alone on urging, four years in advance of any referendum, that the UK remains in the corrupt and hugely costly European Union.

It is well known that many industrialists, especially large employers are in favour of the UK remaining in the EU – they thrive on the potentially large pool of cheap labour (and this even before Turkey becomes a potential EU Member).

Sir Mike Rake, President of the CBI adds an early warning to the likely deluge of ‘advice’ from the business world, that Britain could lose its status to Dusseldorf as the ‘launch point’ into Europe for Asian car makers.  Why do these people not realise that the longer term effects of Britain’s exit from the EU is more likely to be beneficial at best, and neutral at worst! There is a whole globe with which to trade!

It is a good job that the business vote has been abolished a long time ago, now they have one vote only!

Dr Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

 

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Softening Up Britain in Advance of a Referendum‏

The scaremongering amongst business interests and elites should the UK decide to leave the corrupt European Union is getting into full swing!

Not content with their government warning last month about the likely effects of a British withdrawal following a referendum, ‘the head of Hitachi’, according to The Times (12 October 2013) ‘has warned David Cameron that thousands of British jobs dependent on the Japanese company would be at risk if the country were to leave the European Union’. Not content with such misleading information, intended to frighten us (just what kind of people do they imagine we are?), Hiraoki Nakanishi, Hitachi’s Chief Executive, ‘urges the Prime Minister to be more pro-European’.

Never mind the deceit here – how inappropriate is it for an unelected Japanese industrialist to interfere in the UK’s internal affairs. Mr. Nakanishi is clearly unaware that Mr. Cameron is an enthusiastic pro- EU politician with an electorate to consider!  The Japanese Deputy Foreign Minister, Yasumasa Nafamine also deemed it appropriate to blatantly intervene in Britain’s internal affairs stating that Japan ‘ wants the UK to continue playing a very important role in your region- Europe’. These people’s comprehension of history and democracy verges on zero.

One wonders at the possible Japanese response if they were told to be more friendly and embrace the Chinese and play a more balanced role in their region,  South East Asia, whilst allowing the countries of that region to play a more active role-economic, political and legal in Japanese society?

Dr Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

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The EU and carbon reduction

In a moment of unreflective enthusiasm at the Labour Party conference,Ed Milliband announced that, should he become Prime Minister in 2015, he would freeze energy prices until the end of 2017.

He clearly has not considered if this is permissible within existing European carbon reduction requirements or indeed whether this would be allowed to interfere with the free flow of goods and services as required by EU Treaties.

Irrespective of these,there is a further obstacle to reducing prices!  He must know that the Gas Act 1986 and similar regulations dealing with electricity , including Statutory Instruments issued by Ministers, requires energy companies to impose carbon reduction measures by means of levies; most companies have chosen to impose these on consumers, of between 4-11% in the last 2 years on energy bills.  In my understanding, there is no constraint on the amount of levy a company can impose!  Thus there is no reason or obstacle to prevent any price freeze to be cancelled out by a commensurate, or even greater rise in the levy!  I very much hope I am mistaken on this point, but the failure of energy companies, the regulator, relevant Committee Chairmen and including the Minister for the Environment to give any assurance on this point leads me to conclude that there are massive vested interests at play here!

Dr.  Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

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Merkel a greater threat to Britain than Hitler?

Bill Cash MP speaking at a fringe meeting in Manchester during the Conservative Party conference organised by the Bruges group on 30 September 2013, commented on the re-election of Angela Merkel.  He said she was an enthusiastic federalist and represented a greater threat to Britain’s sovereignty than Hitler did during WW2.  Since her threat is covert, whereas Hitler’s was visible on the battlefields, Bill Cash is most likely to be right.

Dr. Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

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Post Office Closures

Is it not astonishing – and deliberately misleading the public – for MP’s up and down the country to campaign for Post Offices to remain open? MPs must know – especially Labour MPs – who supported the Blair/Brown governments from 1997-2005 when they signed every EU Diktat placed before them – that the EU requires 20% of all Post Offices to be liberalised (privatised!).

Having given away the right to self governing, bleating about this measure is sheer hypocritical.

Robert Gutfreund-Walmsley

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